Do you want to know how much vineyard businesses make monthly? If YES, here is a quick analysis detailing the income potential of vineyard owners.

One saying has it that if you want to earn $1 million out of a vineyard, you should be willing to invest $10 million. If vineyard owners are investing such a huge sum just to make the vineyards work, how much then do they gain out of the business?

Being able to ascertain how much vineyard owners make is a really difficult endeavour because the vine business is usually private and owners don’t publicize their personal financial statements. This doesn’t mean that there is a lot of competition in the business.

It is said that all vineyard owners speak positively but cannot give you any useful financial information regarding their vineyard and how it is being run. With information being scant in this regard, we will try to make an estimate by how much vineyard owners pay your employees.

How Much Do Vineyard Owners Make Monthly/Annually

According to a 2011 survey salary conducted by Wine Business Monthly magazine, the average salary of a winemaker in the United States was $108,518, an increase of 5.6 percent from the average winemaker salary reported in 2010. Winemakers reported some of the highest average incomes for non-administrative positions in the wine industry.

In comparison, tasting room managers averaged less than $60,000 per year, while vineyard managers averaged nearly $85,000 per year. Base wages in the wine industry grew over the past year, with top positions benefiting the most, according to the 2018 Wine Business Monthly Salary Survey.

Overall, average base salaries rose by 2.7 percent over the past year in what is by and large considered a strong economy with the lowest unemployment rates in nearly two decades. The positions analyzed in the 2018 Salary Survey included two dozen administrative, sales, marketing, winemaking and vineyard positions.

Wages for about 69 percent of the jobs analyzed in the survey rose over the past year, according to the survey. At the same time, average wages for 21 percent of the jobs decreased, and about 10 percent remained essentially flat. The highest paid employees were chief executive officers, whose weighted average salaries increased by 12.4 percent over the past year, the highest increase of the two dozen positions analyzed in the survey.

However, there were differences based on company size. Companies that produce more than 500,000 cases paid their CEOs on average more than $511,000, according to the survey. CEOs at smaller wineries (by case production) received $277,000 in annual salaries, according to the survey.

Tasting room managers’ pay overall decreased by nearly 7 percent, to about $67,200 a year. Tasting room managers were paid the most—about $68,300 annually—at wineries that produce between 50,000 and 99,999 cases a year.

At the largest wineries, those producing more than 500,000 cases annually, tasting room managers received about $66,500 a year in annual pay, according to the survey. At wineries that produce more than 500,000 cases per year, vice presidents of sales earned about $216,000 a year on average—about 10 percent more than a year earlier, according to the survey.

Winemaking directors’ salaries averaged about $171,500 a year—4.7 percent more than the previous year. Vineyard managers were paid about $94,000 annually—5.7 percent more than a year earlier.

For winemaker 1 positions (those more tactical in nature and requiring fewer years of experience), base pay averaged $106,800 a year, about 2 percent less than in 2017. The more experienced winemakers’ annual base pay averaged about $135,000—4 percent decrease from a year earlier.