Are you wondering at the requirements to start a non medical home care company in Kansas? If YES, here is everything you need to know about it in 2022. According to reports, opportunities to start nonmedical home care agencies continue to grow massively in Kansas owing to the aging population and preference of many elders to be cared for in their homes.

As the number of seniors who require non medical home care grows exponentially in Kansas, now is the best time to leverage this opportunity and start this recession proof business. Have it in mind that starting your non medical home care agency to fulfill this extraordinary need will be a rewarding business opportunity.

A non-medical home care business offers assistance with daily tasks of living and socialization to elderly and disabled people. The services they offer include aiding with grocery shopping, house cleaning, bathing, cooking, and transportation. Offering this support might also entail that sometimes caregivers and providers just sit and play chess. Being a non-medical home care provider means filling in wherever there are gaps that might lead to a below-standard or unstable living situation.

Even though the duties and roles of non-medical home care providers will vary from client to client, one of the most important things they are often tasked with is providing support companionship. According to reports, elderly adults are staying in their homes in very massive numbers as they age, rather than moving to assisted living facilities or retirement communities. Although this is more or less a good thing when it comes to maintaining comfort and normalcy, it can also mean that a person’s social circle diminishes with time.

Non Medical home care agencies in Kansas also offer non medical care such as companion and personal care. Fundamentally non-medical home care in Kansas help with every day living exercises, dinner arrangement, housekeeping, and transportation.

Basic Requirements of Starting a Non Medical Home Care Business in Kansas

Have it in mind that it is quite easy to start a non-medical senior home care business in Kansas than it is to start a home health-care business, because the state does not mandate providers to be licensed. However, there are requirements you have to be aware of, and they include;

  1. Operation Requirements

Have in mind that just like other businesses in Kansas, a formal non medical home care business is expected to be registered to be a legally operating business in the state. The first step is to incorporate the nonmedical home care business in Kansas. The next step is to apply for a Tax ID and NPI number.

  1. Tax ID and EIN Number

Just like it was stated above, to open a non medical home care business in Kansas, you need to apply for a Tax ID, EIN, NPI numbers, and licenses. You have to contact the IRS to apply for an employer ID number, also known as an EIN. You also need a state tax permit, and this can be obtained from the secretary of state’s office upon registration. The state tax permit covers income taxes and employment taxes for the business should it require additional assistance.

  1. Local Permits and Licenses

Have it in mind that certain local permits and licenses are required for a nonmedical home care business in Kansas. These are mainly local licenses, which can include a health permit from the county’s health department and an occupational permit from the county’s building and planning department.

  1. Insurance

Have it in mind you will also require insurance for your non-medical home care business. If you drive a client’s car or use your own car to transport clients or their pets, you are expected to get coverage for that. In addition, if you do house-sitting or pet-sitting for clients, you will need “CCC” coverage, which stands for “care, custody, and control.” Check with your insurance agent or an insurance broker to learn what is recommended for your nonmedical home care business.

  1. Office Space

Note that a good office space is another thing you need to consider when starting a non medical home care business in Kansas. Your business office will need a computer, telephone, e-mailing system, fax machine, and patient files so patients can contact the agency during opening hours.

In addition, your business will also need a business checking account and credit card account and apply for business loans if required. The business owner and their personnel will have to take their time to arrange, budget, create service plans, and prepare for home visits.

  1. Policy and Procedures

You will surely need a policy and procedures document for your non medical home care business. You can purchase this, but you have to ensure that they are professionally written and specifically include all of Kansas’s, State and Federal requirements.

Note that your nonmedical home care business policy and procedures must also suit Medicare’s conditions of participation and accrediting body requirements. Operational materials such as new patient admission packets, Personal Files, Logs, Forms, In-service Education Plans, Caregivers Procedures, and Committee Minutes are also required.

  1. Supplies

Note that you won’t need plenty of supplies to start a successful non-medical home care business in Kansas, but there are a few that are very necessary. Notably, you will need a reliable vehicle to drive you to and from your jobs, and a cell phone to always remain in touch with your customers.

Almost any smartphone will do, and you can also use it to keep track of your schedule and the hours you work for each client. Additionally, it is imperative to have business cards printed and perhaps a magnetic sign for your car. Note that you can obtain both online to save money.  Having these will create awareness of your new business, and remind prospects to call you for their home care needs.

Conclusion

In the State of Kansas, to get your new non-medical home care business started, these are the requirements you should consider. However, note that none of these items should cost you much, and the money you will be making will cover the expense.

Joy Nwokoro