Do you want to get auto insurance but you have a suspended license? If YES, here is a quick guide on how to get car insurance without a license.

Actually, there is no law against buying a car without a driver’s or a suspended license. Instead, there are laws in every state in the United States that does not allow anyone to drive without a driver’s license or permit. To purchase a car and register it with the state where you live, you will need photo identification and car insurance.

Getting car insurance without a driver’s license is not easy. You have to start by calling around to different insurance agencies. But have it in mind that you might get brushed off immediately if you do not have the requirements. If you tell an insurance agent you do not have a license and want to insure your car; you will more than likely be told it is not possible. It is standard procedure to verify a driver’s license before an insurance policy is issued.

It’s important that you never try to hide, stretch the truth, or withhold information from an insurance agent. Be honest with an agent and ask for suggestions if they are unable to help you.

You, the unlicensed driver, will need to be excluded as a driver on the policy. A spouse may have to obtain insurance on the vehicle although some insurance carriers will probably decline coverage. Check with insurance carriers who write high-risk policies for this problem. If the primary driver lives with you but is not a spouse, you can be named insured on a policy and excluded as a driver at the same time. The primary driver can then be listed as a driver on the policy.

You will probably have to do a little checking around to find an insurance carrier that offers this option. In a counter scenario, a primary driver might be able to insure the vehicle even though it is not titled to them under their current auto insurance policy.

A lot of insurance carriers only allow you to insure a vehicle which is titled to the named insured. Make sure to explain who the vehicle is titled to at the time of insuring the vehicle. If the first option does not work out, consider looking for alternative insurance carriers which do allow a named insured to purchase a policy for an un-owned vehicle.

How to Get Insurance Without License

It can be very hard to get Insurance for your vehicle if you don’t have a driver’s license. It is not a legal requirement to have a license when purchasing car insurance, but most national insurers—such as GEICO, State Farm, Progressive and Allstate—will most likely turn you away without a license.

Instead, you should focus on small and regional companies or contact a local independent agent who may be familiar with insurers that provide policies to unlicensed drivers. You may need to call insurers directly, as you must provide a valid license number when purchasing a policy online.

They are insurance companies that will cover you if you have a state-issued ID card. But your best bet for finding insurance is to speak with a local independent agent. These agents are licensed to write auto insurance policies for different insurers and could be familiar with local companies that issue no-license car insurance.

Consult as many agencies as possible, as rules and procedures may vary. Also, it’s best to be truthful regarding your license status when getting a car insurance quote. An insurer will run a Motor Vehicle Report (MVR) when calculating your premium.

An MVR details your driving history. If you use a fake or invalid driver’s license number, it will register on your MVR. The insurance company could drop you, forcing you to start over again. Although it may be difficult to find auto insurance without a license, you can save yourself time and trouble by being upfront about your driving situation. Below are step by step procedures to acquiring car insurance without a valid license.

  1. Find a Car Insurance Company to Provide a Policy

A few reasons can make you buy car insurance without a driver’s license. You will need to prove your reason with documentation. If you’re unable to drive but want to own and insure a car that someone else will use to drive you around, you will need legal proof. Disability papers or medical documentation will be necessary.

If you have surrendered your driver’s license as a senior citizen but will have someone such as a grandchild drive you around, you will need to prove residency. Most insurers will not allow someone with the same address to be your driver. If you have lost your license due to a driving conviction, you will need proof for your insurance provider.

As a higher-than-normal risk policy, you will need to contact providers to discover if they will sell you car insurance without a driver’s license. Just as the situation is unique for each individual, you may need to phone several insurers for competing quotes.

Have your supporting documentation on hand to prove your need for car insurance under your extenuating circumstances. Choose the car insurance that best suits your desire. Consider the cost, the deductible, and the levels of coverage available when you select your car insurance policy.

  1. Get your car insurance

First and foremost, you will have to provide your complete driver’s profile. You will need your identification and your previous driver’s license number if you had one. It’s best if the person driving your car is present with you when you set up the policy. You will need to provide the vehicle’s VIN and the make, model, and trim.

You might also need to give the approximate mileage on the odometer. Pay for your car insurance. The insurer will let you know how you can make your payment. If you’re calling to set up car insurance over the phone, you can pay by credit card in many cases. You will be provided with a copy of the car insurance policy, either in person or sent to you digitally.

How to Get Insurance With a Suspended License

People who have their licenses suspended have different options for getting car insurance than those who have never had a driver’s license or have had it revoked. License suspension is often the consequence for serious traffic violations like driving under the influence (DUI) or driving without insurance.

Sometimes, when you have a suspended license, the best course of action is to obtain a restricted license from your state’s department of motor vehicles, which may conditionally reinstate your driving privileges. Also, in some cases, getting SR-22 insurance may be the only way to get car insurance coverage and getting back your driving privileges after your license is suspended.

  1. Apply for a Restricted or Conditional License

Some insurers in the United States will more or less offer you insurance coverage if you can apply for a restricted license. To find a car insurance policy with a restricted license, you will likely be limited to Non-Standard Insurance, which specialize in covering high-risk drivers.

Nonstandard insurers include: Acceptance, The General and Titan Insurance. Meanwhile, a restricted license, also known as a hardship license, gives you back your driving privileges if your license was previously suspended for a traffic violation. Your eligibility and the specific terms for your restricted license differ from state to state.

But, you may be ineligible to apply for a restricted license if you have had a previous suspension. Additionally, a restricted license may only allow you to drive during the day or only for designated purposes, such as getting to work or school.

In some states, instead of a restricted license, you can apply for a conditional license if your driving privileges have been suspended. Obtaining a conditional license gives you back your ability to drive usually under the condition that you complete a DMV-sponsored driving program.

In New York, for instance, individuals whose licenses have been suspended for a drinking and driving violation could receive a conditional license if they attend a DMV-approved Impaired Driver Program.

  1. Get SR-22 Insurance

In this particular option, once your license was suspended because of a serious traffic violation, such as driving while intoxicated or without insurance, your state may mandate you to get an SR-22 insurance policy before your license can be reinstated.

SR-22 insurance is a type of policy in which your insurer files a form with the DMV that attests you have the required auto insurance coverage in your state. Although some insurers can offer you SR-22 coverage, some standard insurers may not give you a quote because they consider you a high-risk driver. Instead, nonstandard car insurance companies may be your best options to insure your vehicle.