For a very long time, the couponing trend has continued growing, but with technology at our fingertips, more and more shoppers receive and redeem promo codes digitally. While collecting coupons may sound appealing, doing so is considered unethical by companies that distribute coupons.

Since almost all manufacturer’ coupon redemption policies clearly state that buying and selling coupons voids the value of the coupon, there is no legitimate way to sell coupons that have value. The actual term for redeeming a purchased coupon is “redemption fraud,” yet there are so many websites where shoppers can order the coupons they want, even with the clearly – stated redemption policies.

The owners of the coupon-clipping websites claim that they are selling their service, not coupons. The service fees cover their cost of maintaining the website and clipping, grouping, managing and mailing the coupons. The costs can range from under a dollar to monthly subscription rates.

Notably, there is no type of legislation anywhere in the world that classifies this kind of service as illegal. However, what the Federal Trade Commission states is, “Selling or transferring coupons to a third party violates most manufacturers’ coupon redemption policies – and usually voids the coupon.”

Have it in mind that most people that use coupon-clipping services or eBay are going to use the coupons that they have purchased, and it is doubtful that most cashiers will know if a coupon was clipped at home or bought through an online service. But for those who are concerned with what is ethical, the answer is clear – buying and selling coupons is not ethical.

Various Places to Buy Coupons Cheaply

Knowing where to find the very best coupons is a good place to start. Below are some of the places to consider;

  1. Printable Coupons

Indeed there are numerous websites designed exclusively for shoppers looking for online printable grocery and drugstore coupons. Most of the sites have agreements with national grocery stores and provide store-specific coupons. Other sites have national manufacturer coupons, but also have agreements with grocery store chains to accept the coupons.

  1. Buying Coupons Online

Auction sites such as eBay have become a popular source for finding coupons. It is illegal to sell coupons, but charging for the time spent to collect and organize the coupons is legal. Owing to this loophole in the legislation, there are many coupons available on auction sites.

Usually, the coupons up for auction come in a bundle, such as 20 coupons for a specific brand of baby food. There are also websites that are coupon clipping services. These sites have an abundance of coupons that you can buy and have shipped to you. They work under the same loophole that they are providing a clipping service, which is not the same as selling coupons.

The sites are popular with couponers because they can get multiple coupons for the same product and find coupons that are not available in their area. TheCouponClippers.com and Coupons and Things by Dede are rated high on coupon forums.

  1. The Newspaper

Even in our Internet era, the Sunday newspaper is still one of the most popular sources for finding grocery coupons. The coupons distributed in the papers are regional; meaning different parts of the country will receive different coupons.

Newspapers distributed in the major cities will have more coupons than small town newspapers. If you reside in a small town, you will get more bangs for your buck by getting the Sunday newspaper from a larger city.

  1. Direct Mail

Direct mail is sent from companies that value-conscious shoppers sign up to receive. Procter and Gamble, Target, and Bed Bath & Beyond are a few examples. There is also Valpak, which sends monthly coupons through the mail. Most of the time, the coupons are targeted at service-related local companies, restaurants, and home maintenance.

  1. Free Products, Junk Mail

Note that one very effective way to get shoppers to try a new product is to offer them a trial size for free. Many times shoppers avoid this type of promotion because of the fear of getting bombarded with junk mail.

But a coupon will almost always come along with the free product. Also, junk mail can be a good source of coupons. If dealt with daily by separating the good from the bad, junk mail can be something coupon clippers look forward to receiving.

  1. Magazines

Magazines and coupons go together like coffee and cream, depending on the type of magazines you buy. For instance, grocery coupons are common in lifestyle and home and garden magazines. Fashion magazines will have coupons for makeup, personal care products, and retail stores. However, before investing in a magazine subscription, buy a single copy and see if there are enough coupons to warrant an investment in a subscription.

  1. Grocery Store Websites

Note that almost all grocery store chains have websites with store coupons, loyalty club perks, and weekly circulars posted. This can be a great source for combining coupons and sales for extra savings.

  1. Product Packaging

Just before you toss out the package wrap or that empty can, stop and look for a coupon. Note that so many manufacturers include valuable coupons and rebate forms inside or on product packaging.

The expiration dates on product packaging coupons are based on the shelf life of the product, which will be longer than coupons printed online or clipped out of the newspaper. You may have four weeks to use a coupon you found online and six months on a coupon you found on packaging. This goes for the face value as well.

  1. Manufacturers’ Websites

Also, some manufacturers offer coupons and other promotional information on their websites. This includes many of the companies that sell organic foods as well as those producing meat, dairy and produce. Doing an online search using the product name will result in a link to the manufacturer’s website.

Explore the site for ways to save on the product, including signing up for the newsletters or joining loyalty programs that allow you to earn points that you can redeem for coupons and free products.

10 Best Places to Sell your Coupons Fast With Good Margin

Globally, there is a massive market for coupons. You can be a part of it, whether you’re an affiliate marketer looking for a place to purchase promotional and coupon codes to power your online business or an entrepreneur who deals in the sale of promo codes. Here are top places to sell coupons;

  • eBay

Almost everything can be found on eBay, and coupon codes are no exception. Whether you’re interested in purchasing a few promotional codes to save some money on an item you intend to buy or you want to sell promotional codes that you already have on hand, you can get started on eBay.

  • Bigcommerce

Note that setting up a store through Bigcommerce allows you to give coupon codes away for free. It also lets you sell them as digital products through a store powered by the site.

  • For Me To Coupon

This is a well renowned place for affiliates to obtain promotional codes. For Me To Coupon offers a consolidated coupon feed from more than 5,000 merchant programs. It has 50 updates and 550 new deals each day. It also offers a free 30-day trial period.

  • Coupon Feed

Affiliates who have neither the time nor the patience to sort through a variety of feeds each day for coupon codes can turn to Coupon Feed, a service that delivers those deals to you each day.

  • FeedShare

With storefronts, data feeds and an affiliate marketing program, making money by buying or selling coupon codes is simple using the FeedShare model.

  • E-junkie

E-junkie is an e-commerce site that facilitates sales for merchants and simplifies the process of locating specific products for consumers. You can buy and sell a variety of promotional codes here.

  • Tradebit

Have it in mind that buying coupon codes to post on your blog or host on your website is easy with Tradebit, an e-commerce site that also makes quick work of selling those same promotional codes to interested affiliate marketers.

  • PayLoadz

As one of the most popular e-commerce sites on the web, PayLoadz is an ideal stop for merchants and consumers alike. Hosting your own promotional codes or purchasing them to bolster your own website’s traffic is quick and easy because the PayLoadz site is easy to navigate. It has a clean interface and accepts PayPal and Google Checkout payment processing options.

  • Kagi

Several categories are in the Kagi marketplace. This makes it easy for buyers to locate files. Selling promotional and coupon codes as a digital download through the Kagi store can bolster your income and generate revenue streams consistently.

  • Sellfy

Selling digital products through the e-commerce platform, Sellfy allows users to post a simple link on a website, social networking feed, or an email. Offering coupon and promotional codes without investing in your own website or storefront is less complicated using the Sellfy service.

Conclusion

Many couponers like to buy coupons from coupon-clipping services or through eBay. It allows them to assess the coupons that they know they will use, find multiple coupons for the same items and have access to many coupons that they may not get locally. But whether you choose to buy and sell coupons as a side gig or want to make use of the coupons, these places mentioned above can be of immense help.

The internet is a wonderful source for couponers to find coupons. It is also an ideal source for criminals who sell stolen coupons. This puts buyers at risk of not only buying stolen or counterfeit coupons, but also sharing their credit card numbers or bank account information with thieves.

This does not mean that every website advertising coupon clipping services or auctioning coupons is fraudulent. Instead, most of the people in the business of selling or auctioning coupons have studied the laws and have added disclaimers to their websites that keep them well within the legal boundaries of the law.

However, it is always imperative that buyers know the risk of buying coupons online. There is an abundance of coupons that you can find that are free and do not test the terms of the manufacturers’ redemption policies.

Solomon. O'Chucks