Do you want to move to UK to look for job opportunities? If YES, here is every detail you need to live, work and start a business in UK as a foreigner.

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, which is commonly known as the United Kingdom (UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country located off the north-western coast of the European mainland. The United Kingdom includes the island of Great Britain, the north-eastern part of the island of Ireland, and many smaller islands.

Northern Ireland is the only part of the United Kingdom that shares a land border with another sovereign state, the Republic of Ireland. Apart from this land border, the United Kingdom is surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean, with the North Sea to the east, the English Channel to the south and the Celtic Sea to the south-west, giving it the 12th-longest coastline in the world.

The Irish Sea separates Great Britain and Ireland. The United Kingdom’s 242,500 square kilometers (93,600 sq mi) were home to an estimated 66.0 million inhabitants in 2017.

Live, Work and Start a Business in UK as a Foreigner

The United Kingdom is a unitary parliamentary democracy and constitutional monarchy. The current monarch is Queen Elizabeth II, who has reigned since 1952, making her the world’s longest-serving current head of state. The United Kingdom’s capital and largest city is London, a global city and financial center with an urban area population of 10.3 million. Other major cities include Birmingham, Manchester, Glasgow, Leeds and Liverpool.

The United Kingdom consists of four constituent countries: England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland. Their capitals are London, Edinburgh, Cardiff, and Belfast, respectively. Apart from England, the countries have their own devolved governments, each with varying powers, but such power is delegated by the Parliament of the United Kingdom, which may enact laws unilaterally altering or abolishing devolution.

Business Opportunities in UK According to Countries

More Business ideas and Opportunities in UK

Job Opportunities and Business ideas in UK According to Cities

  1. Aberdeen
  • Population: 196,670 (2018 estimate)

By tradition, Aberdeen was home to fishing, textile mills, shipbuilding and paper making. These industries have been largely replaced. High technology developments in the electronics design and development industry, research in agriculture and fishing and the oil industry, which has been largely responsible for Aberdeen’s economic boom in the last three decades, are now major parts of Aberdeen’s economy.

Aberdeen City and Shire’s Gross Domestic Product is estimated at over £11.4 billion, accounting for over 17 percent of the overall Scottish GDP. Five of Scotland’s top ten businesses are based in Aberdeen with a collective turnover of £14 billion, yielding a profit in excess of £2.4 billion.

Alongside this, 29 of Scotland’s top 100 businesses are located in Aberdeen with an employment rate of 77.9 percent, making it the 2nd highest UK city for employment. In 2011, the Centre for Cities named Aberdeen as the best placed city for growth in Britain, as the country looked to emerge from the recent economic downturn. This is indeed a good reason why you should consider investing in Aberdeen.

  1. Bangor, Gwynedd
  • Population: 18,810 (2011 census)

Classical music is performed regularly in Bangor, with concerts given in the Powis and Prichard-Jones Halls as part of the university’s Music at Bangor concert series. Bangor was home to the County Theatre, a converted chapel on Dean Street.

The city has long been the most cosmopolitan settlement in Gwynedd, attracting incomers from both England and further afield, with Bangor University being a key institution. This is indeed a good reason why you should consider investing in the city.

  1. Bath, Somerset
  • Population: 88,859

The city boasts of strong software, publishing and service-oriented industries, being home to companies such as Future plc and London & Country mortgage brokers. The city’s attraction to tourists has also led to a significant number of jobs in tourism-related industries. Important economic sectors in Bath include education and health (30,000 jobs), retail, tourism and leisure (14,000 jobs) and business and professional services (10,000 jobs).

Bath is the largest city in the county of Somerset, England. The city is connected to Bristol and the sea by the River Avon, navigable via locks by small boats. The river was connected to the River Thames and London by the Kennet and Avon Canal. This is indeed a good reason why you should consider investing in the city.

  1. Belfast
  • Population: 340,200 (2018 estimate)

As with any modern economy, the service sector is vital to Northern Ireland’s development and is enjoying excellent growth. In particular, the region has a booming tourist industry with record levels of visitors and tourist revenue and has established itself as a significant location for call centers. Since the ending of the region’s conflict, tourism has boomed in Northern Ireland, greatly aided by low cost.

One good reason why you should consider investing in the city is the fact that Belfast has been the fastest-growing economy of the thirty largest cities in the UK over the past decade, a new economy report by Howard Spencer has found.

The Times wrote about Belfast’s growing economy: “According to the region’s development agency, throughout the 1990s Northern Ireland had the fastest-growing regional economy in the UK, with GDP increasing 1 per cent per annum faster than the rest of the country.”

  1. Birmingham
  • Population: 1,141,374 (2018 estimate)

Birmingham grew to prominence as a manufacturing and engineering centre. Today the economy of Birmingham is dominated by the service sector, which in 2012 accounted for 88 percent of the city’s employment. Birmingham is the largest centre in Great Britain for employment in public administration, education and health; and after Leeds the second largest centre outside London for employment in financial and other business services.

It is ranked as a beta- world city by the Globalization and World Cities Research Network, the second highest ranking in the country after London, and its wider metropolitan economy is the second-largest in the United Kingdom with a GDP of $121.1bn (2014 est., PPP).

Birmingham’s GVA was £24.8bn (2015 est.,), economic growth accelerated each successive year between 2013 and 2015, and with an annual growth of 4.2 percent in 2015, GVA per head grew at the second fastest rate of England’s eight “Core Cities”. This is indeed a good reason why you should consider investing in the city.

  1. City of Bradford
  • Population: 537,173 (2018 estimate)

Traditionally based on the wool and textile industries, manufacturing is still strong, accounting for around 1 in 5 jobs. The city’s service-sector economy accounts for 77 percent of the district’s 195,000 jobs, with today’s fastest-growing sectors including information technology, financial services, tourism and retail headquarters and distribution.

The economy of Bradford is worth around £9.5 billion, contributing around 8.4 percent of the region’s output, and making the district the third largest after Leeds and Sheffield in Yorkshire & Humber.

Bradford has been named by research group OMIS as one of the top six cities in the UK equipped for future growth, and the CBI reports that business confidence is higher in Bradford than in the UK as a whole, whilst £1.5 billion of construction work is transforming Bradford in a bid to attract further investment.

The entrepreneurial spirit is more present in Bradford than generally in the UK, with start-ups accounting for 12 percent of the business community. This is indeed a good reason why you should consider investing in Bradford.

  1. Brighton and Hove
  • Population: 290,395 (mid 2018 estimate)

The economy of the city is service-based with a strong emphasis on creative, digital and electronic technologies. Tourism and entertainment are important sectors for the City, which has many hotels and amusements, as well as Brighton Pier and Shoreham/Portslade Harbour.

One of the reasons why an investor should consider investing in Brighton and Hove is the fact that the city can boast of world – class infrastructure that supports business growth.

  1. Bristol
  • Population: 463,400 (2017 estimate)

Bristol has a long history of trade, originally exporting wool cloth and importing fish, wine, grain and dairy products; later imports were tobacco, tropical fruits and plantation goods. Major imports are motor vehicles, grain, timber, produce and petroleum products. The city’s economy also relies on the aerospace, defence, media, information technology, financial services and tourism industries.

One good reason why an investor should consider investing in the city is that Bristol is one of the eight-largest regional English cities that make up the Core Cities Group, and is ranked as a gamma world city by the Globalization and World Cities Research Network, the fourth-highest-ranked English city.

In 2017 Bristol’s gross domestic product was £88.448 billion. Its per capita GDP was £46,000 ($65,106, €57,794), which was some 65 percent above the national average, the third-highest of any English city (after London and Nottingham) and the sixth-highest of any city in the United Kingdom (behind London, Edinburgh, Glasgow, Belfast and Nottingham).

  1. Cambridge
  • Population: 125,758 (mid 2018 estimate)

Today Cambridge has a diverse economy with strength in sectors such as research & development, software consultancy, high value engineering, creative industries, pharmaceuticals and tourism. Described as one of the “most beautiful cities in the world” by Forbes in 2010, with the view from The Backs being selected as one of the 10 greatest in England by National Trust chair Simon Jenkins. Tourism generates over £750 million for the city’s economy.

One of the reasons why an investor should consider investing in Cambridge is the fact that the city can boast of world – class infrastructure that supports business growth.

  1. Cardiff
  • Population: 362,800 (2017 estimate)

As the capital city of Wales, Cardiff is the main engine of growth in the Welsh economy. Though the population of Cardiff is about 10 percent of the Welsh population, the economy of Cardiff makes up nearly 20 percent of Welsh GDP and 40 percent of the city’s workforce are daily in-commuters from the surrounding south Wales area.

Today, Cardiff is the principal finance and business services centre in Wales, and as such there is a strong representation of finance and business services in the local economy.

This sector, combined with the Public Administration, Education and Health sectors, have accounted for around 75 percent of Cardiff’s economic growth since 1991. Cardiff is one of the most popular tourist destination cities in the United Kingdom, receiving 18.3 million visitors in 2010 and generating £852 million for the city’s economy.

The city was recently placed seventh overall in the top 50 European cities in the fDI 2008 Cities of the Future list published by the fDi magazine, and also ranked seventh in terms of attracting foreign investment. This is indeed a good reason why you should consider investing in Cardiff.

  1. City of Carlisle
  • Population: 108,387

In 2001, of 46,858 residents of the City of Carlisle in employment, the industry of employment was 20.4 percent retail and wholesale, 15.9 percent manufacturing, 11.1 percent health and social work, 8.1 percent property and business services, 7.7 percent transport and communications, 7.3 percent construction, 6.4 percent education, 5.9 percent hotels and restaurants, 5.8 percent public administration and defence, 3.1 percent agriculture, 2.3 percent finance, 0.7 percent energy and water supply, 0.3 percent mining, and 4.5 percent other.

One of the reasons why an investor should consider investing in the city is the fact that the city can boast of world – class infrastructure that supports business growth.

  1. Chester
  • Population: 79,645

Chester’s main industries are now the service industries comprising tourism, retail, public administration and financial services. Many domestic and international tourists visit to view the city’s landmarks and heritage with a complementary benefit to hotels and restaurants.

In 2007, Chester Council announced a 10-year plan to see Chester become a “must see European destination”. At a cost of £1.3 billion, it has been nicknamed Chester Renaissance. As of July 2013, Chester had the highest rate of home foreclosure in the country, at three times the national average. This is indeed a good reason why you should consider investing in Chester.

  1. Coventry
  • Population: 366,785

The manufacture of machine tools was once a major industry in Coventry. Alfred Herbert Ltd became one of the largest machine tool companies in the world. Coventry’s main industries include: cars, electronic equipment, machine tools, agricultural machinery, man-made fibres, aerospace components and telecommunications equipment.

In recent years, the city has moved away from manufacturing industries towards business services, finance, research, design and development, creative industries as well as logistics and leisure. One of the reasons why an investor should consider investing in Coventry is the fact that the city can boast of world – class infrastructure that supports business growth.

  1. Derby
  • Population: 248,700 (2011 census)

Derby’s two biggest employers, Rolls-Royce Holdings and Toyota are engaged in engineering manufacturing. Other companies of note include railway systems engineering firm Bombardier Transportation who manufacture railway rolling stock at Derby Litchurch Lane Works, First Source, who deal with much of Sky’s telephone support, and Alstom who manufactures large power plant boilers and heat exchangers.

One of the reasons why an investor should consider investing in the city is the fact that the city can boast of world – class infrastructure that supports business growth.

  1. Dundee
  • Population: 148,270 (2018 estimate)

Dundee is a key retail destination for North East Scotland and has been ranked 4th in Retail Rankings in Scotland. The Professional, Scientific and Technical sectors saw an upsurge in jobs in addition to the Business Administration and Support Service sector which increased by approximately 1,000 full-time and 300 part-time jobs in the same six-year period.

Dundee is a regional employment and education centre, with around 325,000 people within 30 minutes’ drive of the city centre and 860,000 people within one hour. Over a five-year period (2011-2015) the number of registered enterprises in Dundee increased by 20.9 percent from 2,655 to 3,210. This is indeed a good reason why you should consider investing in Dundee.

  1. Edinburgh
  • Population: 518,500 (2018 estimate)

Banking has been a mainstay of the Edinburgh economy for over 300 years, since the Bank of Scotland (now part of the Lloyds Banking Group) was established by an act of the Scottish Parliament in 1695.

Today, the financial services industry, with its particularly strong insurance and investment sectors, and underpinned by Edinburgh-based firms such as Scottish Widows and Standard Life Aberdeen, accounts for the city being the UK’s second financial centre after London and Europe in terms of equity assets.

It is the second largest financial centre in the United Kingdom and the city’s historical and cultural attractions have made it the United Kingdom’s second most popular tourist destination attracting 1.75 million visits from overseas in 2016.

Edinburgh has the strongest economy of any city in the United Kingdom outside London and has the highest percentage of professionals in the UK with 43 percent of the population holding a degree-level or professional qualification. According to the Centre for International Competitiveness, it is the most competitive large city in the United Kingdom. This is indeed a good reason why you should consider investing in Edinburgh.

  1. Exeter
  • Population: 130,428 (mid 2018 estimate)

The services industry is the most thriving industry in the city. Exeter provides services, employment and shopping for local residents within the city limits and also from nearby towns in Teignbridge, Mid Devon and East Devon, together sometimes known as the Exeter & Heart of Devon area (EHOD).

Although Exeter contains a number of tourist attractions, the city is not dominated by tourism, with only 7 percent of employment dependent on tourism compared with 13 percent for Devon as a whole.

Exeter has been identified among the top ten most profitable locations for a business to be based. Around 35,000 people commute into Exeter on a daily basis, from nearby surrounding towns. This is indeed a good reason why you should consider investing in Exeter.

  1. Glasgow
  • Population: 626,410

Glasgow was once one of the most significant cities in the UK for manufacturing, which generated a great deal of the city’s wealth; the most prominent industry being shipbuilding based on the River Clyde. Glasgow owes much of its economic growth to the shipbuilding industry, which still continues today in the form of BAE Systems Maritime.

The city’s main manufacturing industries include companies involved in; shipbuilding, engineering, construction, brewing and distilling, printing and publishing, chemicals and textiles as well as newer growth sectors such as optoelectronics, software development and biotechnology.

One of the good reasons why an investor should consider investing in Glasgow is that the city has the largest economy in Scotland and is at the hub of the metropolitan area of West Central Scotland. Glasgow also has the third highest GDP Per capita of any city in the UK (after London and Edinburgh).

Glasgow’s annual economic growth rate of 4.4 percent is now second only to that of London. In 2005, over 17,000 new jobs were created, and 2006 saw private-sector investment in the city reaching £4.2 billion, an increase of 22 percent in a single year.

  1. Gloucester
  • Population: 129,285 (mid 2018 estimate)

The service industry is the most thriving industry in the city. Gloucester Business Park is a business park on the outskirts on the city and is home to a number of big brands including Fortis and BAE Systems Applied Intelligence. One of the reasons why an investor should consider investing in the city is the fact that the city can boast of world – class infrastructure that supports business growth.

  1. Hereford
  • Population: 58,896

It is now known chiefly as a trading centre for a wider agricultural and rural area. Products from Hereford include: cider, beer, leather goods, nickel alloys, poultry, chemicals, and cattle, including the famous Hereford breed. Herefordshire is a global centre for cider production as it supports many acres of orchards, so many breweries and associated organisations exist here, along with other heavy and light industries.

A major regeneration project is taking place in Hereford city centre, formerly known as the Edgar Street Grid. This covers an area of around 100 acres (0.40 km2) just north of the old city walls. Hereford is due to receive half of the 20,600 new homes expected to be built in the county by 2026 as part of the Regional Spatial Strategy. This is indeed a good reason for an investor to invest in Hereford.

  1. Kingston upon Hull
  • Population: 260,645 (mid 2018 estimate)

In recent years, with the decline of fishing and heavy industry, the retail sector, tourism, the arts and higher education sectors have played an increasingly prominent role in the process of economic regeneration and raising the profile of the city.

In 2009, it was estimated that businesses in Hull delivered an annual turnover of almost £8 billion, and over 5 million annual visitors contribute almost £210 million to Hull’s economy. As the biggest settlement in the East Riding of Yorkshire and the local transport hub, Hull is a natural focus for retail shoppers. This is indeed a good reason for an investor to invest in the city.

  1. City of Lancaster
  • Population: 144,246 (mid 2018 estimate)

In 2001, of the 55,906 residents of the City of Lancaster in employment, the industry of employment was 16.7 percent retail and wholesale, 14.2 percent health and social work, 11.4 percent education, 11.2 percent manufacturing, 7.8 percent property and business services, 6.7 percent construction, 6.7 percent hotels and restaurants, 6.5 percent transport and communications, 5.7 percent public administration and defence, 2.5 percent finance, 2.4 percent energy and water supply, 2.2 percent agriculture, 0.4 percent mining, and 5.3 percent other.

One of the reasons why an investor should consider investing in the city is the fact that the city can boast of world – class infrastructure that supports business growth.

  1. City of Leeds
  • Population: 789,194 (mid 2018 estimate)

Leeds has a diverse economy with the service sector now dominating over the traditional manufacturing industries. It is the location of one of the largest financial centres in England outside London. New tertiary industries such as retail, call centres, offices and media have contributed to a high rate of economic growth. This is indeed a good reason for an investor to invest in the city.

  1. Leicester
  • Population: 348,300 (mid 2016 estimate)

The city has historically had a strong association with the production of textiles, clothing and shoes. One good reason why an investor should consider investing in the city is because Leicester has the second largest economy in the East Midlands, after Nottingham. Leicester Market is the largest outdoor covered market in Europe selling a wide variety of goods.

  1. Lichfield City
  • Population: 32,219 (2011 census)

Brewing was the principal industry, and in the neighbourhood were large market gardens which provided food for the growing populations of nearby Birmingham and the Black Country. Today there are a number of light industrial areas, predominantly in the east of the city, not dominated by any one particular industry.

The district is famous for two local manufacturers: Armitage Shanks, makers of baths/bidets and showers, and Arthur Price of England, master cutlers and silversmiths.

Lichfield City Council has predicted that, once completed, the new Friarsgate retail and leisure development could attract 11,000 more visitors to the city every month, generating annual sales of around £61 million and creating hundreds of jobs in the city. This is indeed a good reason for an investor to invest in the city.

  1. Lincoln, England
  • Population: 130,200 (2011 census)

Lincoln’s economy is based mainly on public administration, commerce, arable farming and tourism, with industrial relics like Ruston (now Siemens) still in existence. Like many other cities in Britain, Lincoln has developed a growing IT economy, with many e-commerce mail order companies setting up in or around the city.

A plethora of other more conventional small industrial businesses are located in and around Lincoln. One of the reasons for building the University of Lincoln was to increase inward investment and act as a springboard for small companies. The University’s presence has also drawn many more licensed premises to the town centre around the Brayford Pool. This is indeed a good reason for an investor to invest in the city

  1. Liverpool
  • Population: 2,241,000 (2011 census)

In common with much of the rest of the UK today, Liverpool’s economy is dominated by service sector industries, both public and private. Another important component of Liverpool’s economy are the tourism and leisure sectors. Liverpool is the 6th most visited city in the United Kingdom and one of the 100 most visited cities in the world by international tourists.

In 2008, during the city’s European Capital of Culture celebrations, overnight visitors brought £188m into the local economy, while tourism as a whole is worth approximately £1.3bn a year to Liverpool.

One good reason an investor should consider investing in Liverpool is because the Economy of Liverpool is one of the largest within the United Kingdom, sitting at the centre of one of the two core economies within the North West of England.

In 2006, the city’s GVA was £7,626 million, providing a per capita figure of £17,489, which was above the North West average. Liverpool’s economy has seen strong growth since the mid-1990s, with its GVA increasing 71.8 percent between 1995 and 2006 and employment increasing 12 percent between 1998 and 2006. GDP per capita was estimated to stand at $32,121 in 2014, and total GDP at $65.8 billion.

  1. City of London
  • Population: 14,040,163 (2016 estimate)

Whilst the financial sector, and related businesses and institutions, continue to dominate, the economy is not limited to that sector. The legal profession has a strong presence, especially in the west and north (i.e., towards the Inns of Court).

Retail businesses were once important, but have gradually moved to the West End of London, though it is now Corporation policy to encourage retailing in some locations, for example at Cheapside near St Paul’s. The City has a number of visitor attractions, mainly based on its historic heritage as well as the Barbican Centre and adjacent Museum of London, though tourism is not at present a major contributor to the City’s economy.

London is the world’s greatest foreign exchange market, with much of the trade conducted in the City of London. Of the $3.98 trillion daily global turnover, as measured in 2009, trading in London accounted for around $1.85 trillion, or 46.7 percent of the total.

In 2009, the City of London accounted for 2.4 percent of UK GDP. The pound sterling, the currency of the United Kingdom, is globally the fourth most traded currency and the third most held reserve currency. This is indeed a good reason for an investor to invest in the city.

  1. Manchester
  • Population: 3,287,460 (mid 2018 estimate)

The real estate industry is the most thriving industry. According to 2019 property investment research, Manchester is rated as the number 2 location for “The Best Places To Invest In Property In The UK”. This was attributed to a 5.6 percent increase in house prices and local investment into infrastructure and Manchester airport.

The economy grew relatively strongly between 2002 and 2012, where growth was 2.3 percent above the national average. With a GDP of $102.3bn (2015 est., PPP) the wider metropolitan economy is the third-largest in the United Kingdom.

It is ranked as a beta world city by the Globalization and World Cities Research Network. KPMG’s competitive alternative report found that in 2012, Manchester had the 9th lowest tax cost of any industrialized city in the world.

KPMG’s competitive alternative report also found that Manchester was Europe’s most affordable city, ranking slightly better than Dutch cities, Rotterdam and Amsterdam, who all have a cost of living index less than 95. This is indeed a good reason for an investor to invest in the city.

  1. Newcastle upon Tyne
  • Population: 1,650,000 (mid 2018 estimate)

The retail industry is the most thriving industry in Newcastle. In 2010, Newcastle was positioned ninth in the retail centre expenditure league of the UK. There are several major shopping areas in Newcastle City Centre. The largest of these is the Eldon Square Shopping Centre, one of the largest city centre shopping complexes in the UK. It incorporates a Debenhams store as well as one of the largest John Lewis stores in the UK.

Newcastle is in partnership with nearby Gateshead, the cultural focus for North East England. As part of Tyneside, Newcastle’s economy contributes around £13 billion to the UK GVA. This is indeed a good reason for an investor to consider investing in the city.

  1. Norwich
  • Population: 376,500 (mid 2018 estimate)

Norwich’s economy was historically manufacturing based, with a large shoemaking industry, but transitioned throughout the 1980s and 1990s to a service-based economy. The city’s largest employment sectors are business and financial services (31 percent), public services (26 percent), retail (12 percent), manufacturing (8 percent) and tourism (7 percent).

Unemployment in urban Norwich and the Norwich City Council area was 2.7 percent and 3.7 percent respectively in January 2014, compared to 3 percent across Great Britain

In August 2007, Norwich was shortlisted as one of nine finalists in its population group for the International Awards for Liveable Communities (LivCom Awards). The city eventually won a silver award in the small city category. This is indeed a good reason for an investor to consider investing in the city.

  1. Nottingham
  • Population: 1,610,000 (2015)

In 2010, Nottingham City Council announced that the target sectors of their economic development strategy would include low-carbon technologies; digital media; life sciences; financial and business services; and retail and leisure.

Nottingham was named one of the UK’s six science cities in 2005 by the then Chancellor of the Exchequer Gordon Brown. In 2015, Nottingham was ranked in the top 10 UK cities for job growth (from 2004 to 2013), in the public and private sectors.

And in the same year, it was revealed that more new companies were started in Nottingham in 2014-15 than in any other UK city, with a 68 percent year-on-year increase. This is indeed a good reason for an investor to consider investing in the city.

  1. Oxford
  • Population: 244,000

Oxford’s economy includes manufacturing, publishing and science-based industries as well as education, research and tourism. Oxford has been an important centre of motor manufacturing since Morris Motors was established in the city in 1910. The principal production site for Mini cars, owned by BMW since 2000, is in the Oxford suburb of Cowley.

The presence of the university has given rise to many science and technology based businesses, including Oxford Instruments, Research Machines and Sophos. The university established Isis Innovation in 1987 to promote technology transfer.

The Oxford Science Park was established in 1990, and the Begbroke Science Park, owned by the university, lies north of the city. Oxford increasingly has a reputation for being a centre of digital innovation, as epitomized by Digital Oxford. Several startups including Passle, Brainomix, Labstep, and more, are based in Oxford. This is indeed a good reason for an investor to consider investing in the city.

  1. Peterborough
  • Population: 201,041 (mid 2018 estimate)

It has a strong economy in the environmental goods and services sector and has the largest cluster of environmental businesses in the UK.

Peterborough has a history of successful economic growth and continues to act as an attractor for investment and an engine of growth. The overarching ambition is to achieve sustainable growth, which can be maintained without creating significant economic problems.

The city has experienced an economic boom compared to the rest of the country, believed in part to be due to the regeneration plan which ran to 2012. In 2005, growth was on average 5.5 percent, whilst in Peterborough it was 6.9 percent, the highest in the UK.

The city has also led in business population growth, with a 3.78 percent increase between April and September 2006, according to Royal Mail’s Business Barometer. This is indeed a good reason for an investor to consider investing in the city.

  1. Plymouth
  • Population: 263,100 (mid 2018 estimate)

Because of its coastal location, the economy of Plymouth has traditionally been maritime. Devonport Dockyard is the UK’s only naval base that refits nuclear submarines and the Navy estimates that the Dockyard generates about 10 percent of Plymouth’s income.

In terms of retail floorspace, Plymouth is ranked in the top five in the South West, and 29th nationally. Plymouth was one of the first ten British cities to try the new Business Improvement District initiative. This is indeed a good reason for an investor to consider investing in the city.

  1. Portsmouth
  • Population: 1,547,000 (2007 estimate)

The fishing industry is the most thriving industry in the city. There is also a major ferry port that handles both passengers and cargo, and the city has a dedicated fishing fleet consisting of 20 to 30 boats that operate out of the camber docks in Camber Quay, Old Portsmouth.

The city is host to the European headquarters of IBM and, until 2007. In the city centre, shopping is centred on Commercial Road and the 1980s Cascades Shopping Centre, with over 100 high street shops between them. Approximately 185,000 to 230,000 people use the Cascades Shopping Centre each week. This is indeed a good reason for an investor to consider investing in the city.

  1. City of Salford
  • Population: 254,408 (mid 2018 estimate)

Finance and professional services, tourism and culture, and computer and internet based services have been identified as growth industries in Greater Manchester and are concentrated in Manchester and Salford.

In 2007, it was confirmed that the BBC would be moving five of its departments to a new development on Pier 9 of Salford Quays, called MediaCityUK. The move was completed in 2011. This is indeed a good reason for an investor to consider investing in the city.

  1. Sheffield
  • Population: 1,569,000 (mid 2018 estimate)

Sheffield has an international reputation for metallurgy and steel-making. Playing a crucial role in the Industrial Revolution, the city became an industrial powerhouse in the 18th century, and was dubbed “Steel City”.

After many years of decline, the Sheffield economy is going through a strong revival. The 2004 Barclays Bank Financial Planning study revealed that, in 2003, the Sheffield district of Hallam was the highest ranking area outside London for overall wealth, the proportion of people earning over £60,000 a year standing at almost 12 percent.

A survey by Knight Frank revealed that Sheffield was the fastest-growing city outside London for office and residential space during the second half of 2004. The “UK Cities Monitor 2008” placed Sheffield among the top ten “best cities to locate a business today”, the city occupying third and fourth places respectively for best office location and best new call centre location.

The same report places Sheffield in third place regarding “greenest reputation” and second in terms of the availability of financial incentives. This is indeed a good reason for an investor to consider investing in the city.

  1. Southampton
  • Population: 1,547,000 (2011)

Just over a quarter of the jobs available in the city are in the health and education sector. A further 19 per cent are property and other businesses and the third-largest sector is wholesale and retail, which accounts for 16.2 per cent.

In June 2006, 74.7 per cent of the city’s population were classed as economically active. Southampton’s strong economy is promoting redevelopment, and major projects are proposed, including the city’s first skyscrapers on the waterfront.

According to 2004 figures, Southampton contributes around £4.2 billion to the regional economy annually. The vast majority of this is from the service sector, with the remainder coming from industry in the city. This figure has almost doubled since 1995. This is indeed a good reason for an investor to consider investing in the city.

  1. Stoke-on-Trent
  • Population: 678,000 (mid 2018 estimate)

Night-time industry has boomed in recent years, with Hanley becoming increasingly popular for its nightclubs, theatres, pubs, bars and restaurants.

In 2016, Stoke-on-Trent was ranked the second best city to start a business by Quality Formations, based on a number of factors including commercial property, energy, virtual offices, public transport and financial access. KPMG’s Competitive Alternatives 2004 report declared Stoke-on-Trent to be the most cost-effective place to set up a new UK business.

The city currently has the advantage of offering affordable business property, while being surrounded by a belt of affluent areas such as the Peak District, Stone, south Cheshire, and having excellent road links via the A500 and nearby M6 and rail links. This is indeed a good reason for an investor to consider investing in the city.

  1. City of Sunderland
  • Population: 277,962 (2016)

Over recent years, Sunderland city centre has seen a re-development of the Sunniside area taking place, with new bars, cafes and retailers opening their doors on the Eastern side of the city. The Sunniside area now includes an Empire Cinema, Gala Casino and many surrounding eateries.

One of the reasons why an investor should consider investing in the city is the fact that the city can boast of world – class infrastructure that supports business growth.

  1. Swansea
  • Population: 462,000 (2016)

Of the 105,900 people estimated to work within the City and County of Swansea, over 90 percent are employed in the service sector, with relatively high shares (compared to the Welsh and UK averages) in public administration, education & health and banking, finance & insurance, and correspondingly high proportions of employment in occupations associated with the service sector, including professional, administrative/secretarial and sales/customer service occupations.

The local authority believes this pattern reflects Swansea’s role as a service centre for South West Wales. One good reason why an investor should consider investing in Swansea is that the Economic activity and employment rates in Swansea were slightly above the Welsh average in October 2008, but lower than the UK average.

In 2005, GVA per head in Swansea was £14,302 – nearly 4 percent above the Welsh average but 20 percent below the UK average. Median full-time earnings in Swansea were £21,577 in 2007, almost identical to the Welsh average.

  1. City of Westminster
  • Population: 255,324 (mid 2018 estimate)

Mayfair and St. James’s within the City of Westminster also have a large concentration of hedge fund and private equity funds. The West End is known as the Theatre District and is home to many of the leading performing arts businesses. Soho and its adjoining areas house a concentration of media and creative companies. Oxford Street is one of the leading shopping destinations in the world.

The City of Westminster is home to a large number of companies. With 50,100 businesses currently located in Westminster (Experian, 2012), which is around 12 percent of London’s total, and it is a growing figure. Many leading global corporations have chosen to establish their global or European headquarters in the City of Westminster. This is indeed a good reason for an investor to consider investing in the city.

  1. Wolverhampton
  • Population: 262,008 (mid 2014 estimate)

By 2008 the economy was dominated by the service sector, with 74.9 percent of the city’s employment being in this area. The major subcomponents of this sector are in public administration, education and health (32.8 percent of the total employment), while distribution, hotels and restaurants take up 21.1 percent, and finance and IT takes up 12.7 percent.

The largest non-service industry was that of manufacturing (12.9 percent), whilst 5.2 percent of the total employment is related to the tourism industry. According to Eurostat data, Wolverhampton has its own Larger Urban Zone, which had a total resident population in 2004 of 344,400. This is indeed a good reason for an investor to consider investing in the city.

  1. Worcester
  • Population: 101,328 (mid 2015 estimate)

One of the flourishing industries of Worcester was glove making. The city is home to the European manufacturing plant of Yamazaki Mazak Corporation, a global Japanese machine tool builder, which was established in 1980. One of the reasons why an investor should consider investing in the city is the fact that the city can boast of world – class infrastructure that supports business growth.

  1. The City of York
  • Population: 209,893 (mid 2018 estimate)

York’s economy is based on the service industry, which in 2000 was responsible for 88.7 percent of employment in the city. The service industries include public sector employment, health, education, finance, information technology (IT) and tourism that accounts for 10.7 percent of employment. Tourism has become an important element of the economy.

A 2014 report, based on 2012 data, stated that the city receives 6.9 million visitors annually; they contribute £564 million to the economy and support over 19,000 jobs. In the 2017 Condé Nast Traveller survey of readers, York rated 12th among The 15 Best Cities in the UK for visitors. One of the reasons why an investor should consider investing in the city is the fact that the city can boast of world – class infrastructure that supports business growth.